Aging & Older Adult Services

The uncertainty facing boomers is more pronounced than ever, from job transitions to empty nesting to retirement worries. But is there a new way to live and grow professionally beyond midlife? Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures and author of The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife, talks about boomers who are leading the way to a new stage of life.

Recently, Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures, spoke at the Chicago campus of Northwestern University on the subject of his latest book, The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife. This podcast series highlights some of the discussion.

Civic Ventures founder and CEO Marc Freedman talks to Inside E Street, an AARP program broadcast on PBS, about his new book, The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife – and a movement that looks to redefine what comes after midlife.

Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures, discusses his new book – The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife – and the encore years with Radiozine host Crystal Leighty.


Rod Wilson , Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass
Board President
Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass
Launch Pad Finalist

Big Idea

There is no nationwide regulation of assisted living facilities. Assisted living services are private in Kentucky, where I live, and when residents move into assisted living facilities, they don't always realize the level of care is not the same as it is at long-term care facilities. Residents in assisted living facilities need people to advocate for their care.


Milton E. Morgan
Technology Consultant

Launch Pad Finalist

Big Idea

Low-income housing communities for seniors in Santa Barbara, Calif., have computers with Internet access in their community rooms. However, there is no free, one-on-one computer instruction in those communities for residents with little or no computer experience. For seniors who lack access to transportation, attending free classes at libraries, colleges and elsewhere is not a viable alternative. And some seniors feel out of place in the structured environment of formal classrooms.


Anne Cheung , Herald Cancer Care Network
Support Group Organizer
Herald Cancer Care Network
Launch Pad Winner

Big Idea

The aging population is almost never out of the news, but the fact that we're all living longer, is always seen as a problem. But while older people are presented as a threat, they are also widely ignored. As Civic Ventures founder and CEO Marc Freedman argues in his new book, The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife, we need gap years for grown-ups, more backing for midlife entrepreneurs and internships to help boomers make the transition from one stage of life to another.

We all know that Americans are getting older and living longer. But there are many reasons for believing that an age apocalypse won’t arrive. Like your grandfather’s Oldsmobile, the image of an America debilitated by age belongs to a different economy and an earlier generation. Don’t take my word for it. Pick up a copy of The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife by Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures.

By the time the boomers are done with it, old age is likely to be a very different beast than when they found it. Some, like Marc Freedman, author of The Big Shift, argue that a new life stage will have emerged. Just as adolescence became a household concept in the early 20th century, so too will this as-yet-unnamed period – starting somewhere around 55 and continuing roughly through one’s mid-80s – become synonymous with a particular mode of life.

Syndicate content