Technology

100Kin10 has joined forces with The Encore Fellowships Network to fuel the 100Kin10 movement by adding capacity to member organizations in the areas of marketing and communications, strategic planning, data analysis, program design and management, performance management, and talent management. These Fellowships offer a pathway for seasoned professionals and executives to bring their functional expertise and experience to 100Kin10 partners.

What are Encore Fellowships?

An Accidental Encore

College Park Elementary in San Mateo, Calif., had a great computer lab but no one to run it. Gifford Calenda, whose son attends the school, had years of experience developing software at Apple, and – in retirement – he had free time.

Perfect conditions for an encore career.


The notion of encore careers (the term was made popular by Marc Freedman, head of Civic Ventures / Encore.org) has been percolating now for some time. But several factors today are prompting more people to pursue such jobs: undersize nest eggs, increased longevity, a desire to tackle society's ills and, in many cases, an urge to find a different kind of life.

Social Media 101 for Boomers

If you’ve ever thought, “Hmmm, I ought to learn more about social media,” consider this blog post your toe in the water.

I'm a millennial and my job at Civic Ventures (www.encore.org) includes handling social media. Some of you are already familiar with social media. I hope I can make the rest of you comfortable enough to venture in.


Nearly three-fourths of Americans expect to work after retirement. Just over half say they will work by choice, but many say they will have to work out of necessity. Intel recently announced that it is working with Civic Ventures to provide a new option for its retiring employees: an Encore Fellowships program in which Intel will match interested workers with nonprofit organizations. (This article also appeared in the Chicago Tribune.)

Nearly three-fourths of Americans expect to work after retirement. Just over half say they will work by choice, but many say they will have to work out of necessity. Intel recently announced that it is working with Civic Ventures to provide a new option for its retiring employees: an Encore Fellowships program in which Intel will match interested workers with nonprofit organizations. This article also appeared in Kiplinger's Personal Finance.

The folks at the Southwest Initiative Foundation in Minnesota had a hunch. The population it served was aging, and those older than 55 were hardest hit by the recession. So the foundation, which makes microloans and counsels new business owners, began to target encore entrepreneurs. One such entrepreneur is 2011 Purpose Prize fellow Andy Wells, who helps Native Americans and their neighbors train for factory jobs. The prize honors social entrepreneurs 60 and older.

Larry Hara, 56, an engineer at Intel in Cupertino, Calif., isn't ready to retire, but he wants a break from his high-pressure job. Like many boomers, he wants to use his talents to make a difference. Hara will get a chance to take that step without walking off a cliff. In conjunction with Civic Ventures, Intel will match interested workers with nonprofits, where they'll work for six months to a year. Intel retirees admitted to the Encore Fellowship program will get a $25,000 stipend and health insurance.

Three Reasons Why You Shouldn't Use Mobile Apps in Your Job Search

The use of technology has allowed us to multi-task, speak to friends and family in far away lands and shop til we drop, but you should think twice before you use mobile technology to apply for open positions. Here’s why:

1. Lack of Customization
Mobile apps are meant for speed, so when you see a position you like while on the go, all you have to do is press “send resume.”

But that kind of rapid response won’t help you in your job search.


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