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The Encore movement in Australia is enjoying a wave of positive attention. An enthusiastic group of interested people and organisations met with Encore.org Founder and CEO Marc Freedman and Doug Jacquier in Sydney on 4 June 2013. Doug, the former CEO of Australian not-for-profit Connecting Up , is now working to organise an Encore Fellows affiliate program for the country.

The Encore Fellowships program now has a presence in Australia. Encore.org is pleased to be working with our new Network Developer there, Doug Jacquier.

With some 5.5 million ‘baby boomers’ now entering the later stages of their working careers in Australia and around 100,000 significant charities and not-for-profit organisations looking to build their capacity, there is strong interest in ‘second acts for the greater good’.

The Encore Fellowships program now has a presence in Australia. Encore.org is pleased to be working with our new Network Developer there, Doug Jacquier.

With some 5.5 million ‘baby boomers’ now entering the later stages of their working careers in Australia and around 100,000 significant charities and not-for-profit organisations looking to build their capacity, there is strong interest in ‘second acts for the greater good’.

The Encore Fellowships Network is featured as an action case study in the Winter 2013 issue of the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

The article, by researcher Beth Benjamin, begins

"In just two years, the Encore Fellowships Network—which enables professionals to transition from private sector careers into high-impact roles in the nonprofit sector—used a network-scaling model to grow from a single pilot program in Silicon Valley to a network of 200 organizations operating in 20 metropolitan areas nationwide."

Marci Alboher has been rethinking the world of work since she created the popular Shifting Careers column for The New York Times. Now a vice president at Encore.org, Alboher recently chatted with The Allstate Blog about encore careers.

The notion of encore careers (the term was made popular by Marc Freedman, head of Civic Ventures / Encore.org) has been percolating now for some time. But several factors today are prompting more people to pursue such jobs: undersize nest eggs, increased longevity, a desire to tackle society's ills and, in many cases, an urge to find a different kind of life.

The traditional retirement age of 65 is fading, just as the boomer generation begins hitting it. The idea of staying in one job for an entire career is also disappearing, and that can be good news for those looking to make a move. "In their 50s and 60s, people's priorities change," says Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures / Encore.org. "They realize that the road doesn't go on forever.

Wanjiru Kamau will never forget the shock of arriving in Oregon from Kenya, moving as a 20-year-old student to a foreign land. "Leaving my family and my country, coming to a place where I knew no one, that was the most difficult but also the most exciting thing I've done in my life," says Kamau, now 70. To help other African immigrants going through the same difficult transition, Kamau started the nonprofit African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation. In 2011, she won The Purpose Prize.

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