Research

Policies for a 21st Century Workforce

We’ve heard it all before – many, many times before: The U.S. (and the world) is getting older and grayer. People are working longer. Boomers can’t afford to retire.

For many boomers, this is true. People are working longer, often in encore careers, because they can’t afford to retire or because they want to continue making a contribution to their communities.


The Encore Fellowships Network is featured as an action case study in the Winter 2013 issue of the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

The article, by researcher Beth Benjamin, begins

"In just two years, the Encore Fellowships Network—which enables professionals to transition from private sector careers into high-impact roles in the nonprofit sector—used a network-scaling model to grow from a single pilot program in Silicon Valley to a network of 200 organizations operating in 20 metropolitan areas nationwide."

The Ravenswood Family Health Center provides health care for the underserved, uninsured, and most vulnerable low-income residents of communities in southeastern San Mateo County. An experienced Encore Fellow provided expert knowledge that lead to significant cost savings from improved supply chain management and order processing.

The financial challenges posed by midlife career changes are hampering the plans of millions of people who are interested in “encore careers” that can put their experience to work for the greater good. This report reveals how many people have transitioned to encore careers, at what age, the time and costs required for such a transition, obstacles keeping others from making the transition, and recommendations on how to overcome these obstacles.

As many as 9 million people ages 44 to 70 are in encore careers, according to new research from Civic Ventures and MetLife Foundation – and 31 million more are interested in joining them. Even considering the current economy, the study shows an eagerness to create a better world through work.

Click here to view the telephone topline results.

Check out www.encore.org/research to learn more about this and other Civic Ventures research.

As many as 9 million people ages 44 to 70 are in encore careers, according to new research from Civic Ventures and MetLife Foundation – and 31 million more are interested in joining them. Even considering the current economy, the study shows an eagerness to create a better world through work.

Click here to view the online topline results.

Check out www.encore.org/research to learn more about this and other Civic Ventures research.

As many as 9 million people ages 44 to 70 are in encore careers, according to new research from Civic Ventures and MetLife Foundation – and 31 million more are interested in joining them. Even considering the current economy, the study shows an eagerness to create a better world through work.

Click here to view the research report.

Check out www.encore.org/research to view the news release, research highlights, topline results, and overview of research methodology.

As many as 9 million people ages 44 to 70 are in encore careers, according to new research from Civic Ventures and MetLife Foundation – and 31 million more are interested in joining them. Even considering the current economy, the study shows an eagerness to create a better world through work.

Click here to view the research highlights.

Check out www.encore.org/research to view the news release, full report, topline results, and overview of research methodology.

More on Entrepreneurs With a Social Mission

My colleagues and I have been working for the past 10 months with the research firm Penn Schoen Berland to investigate the potential for social entrepreneurship in boomers.

Research by the Kauffman Foundation has already shown that for 11 of the 15 years between 1996 and 2010, Americans between 55 and 64 had the highest rate of entrepreneurial activity of any age group.


New research released by Civic Ventures, a think tank on boomers, work and social purpose, shows that in a tough employment market, millions of Americans in their 40s, 50s and 60s are interested in creating jobs for themselves and others.

“Encore Entrepreneurs: Creating Jobs, Meeting Needs,” which was funded by MetLife Foundation and conducted by Penn Schoen Berland, shows:

  • Approximately 25 million people – one in four Americans ages 44-70 – are interested in starting businesses or nonprofit ventures in the next five to 10 years.
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